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The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'telephone'

Ask Barb

Call People? Talk to Them? What A Concept!



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

How do I get my younger recruiters to make phone calls? They are convinced that our candidates will only communicate by text or email, but I believe this is the way my recruiters want to communicate. They look at me like I’m a dinosaur and don’t listen to my advice. They are not hitting their goals, so how do I force the issue?

Amanda H.
San Jose, CA
How-To, The Business of Recruiting

Are Poor Listening Skills Costing You Money?



Phone laptop office woman

Phone laptop office womanNote: Yesterday, Jeff Allen discussed the importance of having a “phone voice” and how to improve how you sound and what you say when taking on the telephone. Today, the focus is on listening skills.

Poor listening skills are costing you money.

If you’ve ever hung up from taking a job order only to discover later you missed an important detail and blew a placement, then you know just how expensive a mistake it was.

These things happen, but if it’s more than a once in a blue moon thing, blame your listening skills.

In truth, our listening skills have never been especially great. A 1983 study found that on average, viewers who just watched and listened to the evening news could only recall 17.2% of the content when not cued, and the cued group never exceeded 25%. A study a few years later found participants could recall only about 10% of their conversations immediately after they took place.

How-To, Jeff's On Call!

A Four Step Program to Improving Your Phone Voice



Placements and the law logo

The phone voice is almost everything in making placements. Even in personal meetings, 38% of the meaning is conveyed by the voice. Surprisingly, the words themselves only convey 23%. What you convey it is more important than what you say.

Since recruiters (and lawyers) talk so much, they tend to become deaf to their own voices. We practice a four-step program of simple voice improvement techniques. We’ve achieved unbelievable results in negotiation and trial using them. Since I introduced them to our favorite recruiters they’ve made more placements. It’ll work for you too.

Let’s get started!

Cold Calling

‘No’ Could Mean ‘Yes’, So Just Talk to Me



Marigold hotel

Marigold hotel”Just talk to me.”

I saw a post in a sales group on LinkedIn:

How do you generate leads of potential customers in B2B, industrial products, raw materials or semi-finished products?

Actually it was a poll and 33% said they did geographical screening/searching; 33% said they used fairs, ads, associations, the web and etc.; and 33% said they used “other,” but it didn’t say what “other” was.

I bet it’s cold calling.

I saw a movie a while ago  called The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Here’s the trailer.

I loved it and highly recommend it.

It’s about a bunch of financially distressed old farts that travel to Jaipur, India (for various reasons) to spend their golden years in the lap of luxury. When they get there they discover they’ve been taken in by advertising that promised so much more than it delivered.

Or did it?

Cold Calling

Yes’ Could Mean ‘No,’ So Just Talk To Me



fordyce-default

Just talk to me.

I saw a post in a sales group on LinkedIn: “How do you generate leads of potential customers in B2B, industrial products, raw materials or semi-finished products?”

Actually it was a poll and 33% said they did geographical screening/searching; 33% said they used fairs, ads, associations, the web and etc.; and 33% said they used “other,” but it didn’t say what “other” was.

I bet it’s cold calling.

You can take the poll here and view the collective wisdom of others immediately.

How-To

Important Questions To Ask Before Hiring A Phone Sourcer



Office Telephone

Editor’s note: Need to hire a phone sourcer, but not sure how to properly vet them? Maureen Sharib, an experienced phone sourcer and trainer who with her husband, runs TechTrak, says you need to ask the right kind of questions to make sure the person you settle on will do a quality job at a fair price. Here are questions she suggests you ask.

What is your definition of phone sourcing? If they say they call companies to “check” on information they find on the Internet (“Is she still there? What’s her title now?”), keep looking. You haven’t found a real “phone sourcer.” If they tell you they find names of people who hold specific titles inside specific organizations that you provide you probably do have a phone sourcer on the line but you need to dig deeper.

Can you explain your process? A phone sourcer should be able to do this without boring you out of your skull or being reluctant to divulge his process.

How long have you been phone sourcing? If it’s less than three to five years you probably don’t have one experienced enough to get through to all of what you need.

Do you specialize in any one niche? Most true phone sourcers don’t. One niche won’t give you the breadth of experience you need to be able to think on your feet.

Cold Calling, Motivation

Make the Phone Your Friend: Focus On Results, Not Volume



Office Telephone

Today I have had a great morning on the telephone, I have:

  • Called my consultants for updates and offered my advice in a couple of areas they were struggling in;
  • Rang my key clients with updates (picked up a few new exclusive roles whilst doing so);
  • Chased a few candidates for interview feedback and was advised to call an excellent professional who is looking for a move (MPC for next week);
  • Spoken with various candidates who are all great matches for two urgent positions we are working on at the moment. One informed me of an interview he had attended recently with a client I have worked with in the past;
  • Chased a lead and have secured a new training session;
  • Made just six calls (to companies I have not spoken to before) on my MPC and arranged two telephone interviews.

I admit I loved every minute of it. All my calls were planned. I did not think for one minute I was making a sales call, but what did happen was I achieved results,. The calls reminded me how much I enjoy using the telephone; the results are instantaneous, not delayed waiting for a reply to an email.

Cold Calling, How-To

Important Questions To Ask Before Hiring A Phone Sourcer



fordyce-default

die-hard phone jockeysEditor’s Note: If you’ve ever hired a sourcer to help with a particularly thorny search, you undoubtedly discovered that not only are they all not alike, but the range of services they provide is vastly different, as are their rates. Maureen Sharib is a phone sourcer who, with her husband, runs TechTrak. A phone sourcer is different from one who primarily sources via the Internet. Both provide a valuable, if different type of service for recruiters. In this post, Maureen offers guidance on hiring a quality phone sourcer.

What is your definition of phone sourcing? If they say they call companies to “check” on information they find on the Internet (“Is she still there? What’s her title now?”), keep looking. You haven’t found a real “phone sourcer.”

If they tell you they find names of people who hold specific titles inside specific organizations that you provide you probably do have a phone sourcer on the line but you need to dig deeper.

Cold Calling, How-To

Getting the Recruit To See You As A Counselor



Cold calling logo

Note: This is the final part of a four part series on cold calling. In part one, Terry talked about the first 30 seconds of making a cold call. Three goals must be achieved in that time, he said: Get attention; Avoid rejection, and; Establish a dialogue. In part two, Terry explained how to begin a dialogue with a client explaining why it is you called them and what you can do to help them. Last week he offered a number of openings that will get the attention of a candidate, even one who’s been hearing from other recruiters regularly

Setting a proper frame of reference with a recruit should be a primary objective during your first in-depth discussion. This will determine whether or not the recruit views you as an asset or a liability.

For the purposes of this article, we will define a recruit as someone with whom you have initiated the first contact, and someone who, at the point of that initial contact, was not actively seeking a change in employment.

Remember: The decision a recruit makes will impact their life to a greater degree than it will impact yours.

Keeping this in mind, it is imperative for you to quickly identify with the recruit any and all potential motivations they may have for a possible job change. This can best be accomplished by asking certain questions. The answers will quickly establish a realistic frame of reference between the two of you, and serve as a foundation for your relationship.

Cold Calling, How-To

Here’s How To Grab That Hot Recruit’s Attention Fast



Cold calling logo

Note: This is part three of a four part series on marketing calls. In part one Terry talked about the first 30 seconds of making a cold call. Three goals must be achieved in that time, he said: Get attention; Avoid rejection, and; Establish a dialogue. In part two, Terry explained how to begin a dialogue with a client explaining why it is you called them and what you can do to help them. The final part will be posted next Thursday.

Have you ever experienced any of the following responses when making your opening comments on a cold recruiting call (not referred by a third party)?

  • “I get calls from recruiters all the time. Take me off your list and don’t call again.”
  • “Tell me the name of the company and I’ll tell you whether or not I’m interested in listening to you.”
  • “I’m not interested in changing jobs.”
  • “How did you get my name?”

When statements like these interrupt your opening comments, it is typically an indication that the targeted recruit has had one or more negative experiences with recruiters and/or you have seriously mispositioned yourself on the call. Although you have no control over the recruit’s previous experience with recruiters, you can and should control your positioning on the call. This positioning begins with your opening comments, which should contain the reason for your call. If your reason for calling does not position you as having something of value for the recruit, they will immediately begin to implement an exit strategy from the call. When this occurs, the recruit stops listening and your call has little chance of success.