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The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'Relationships'

Jeff's On Call!

You Can’t ‘Steal’ An Employee Who Doesn’t Want to Go



ask-jeff3

Hello Jeff -

I enjoy reading your columns. I experienced an incident on which I’d value your opinion.

I submitted a candidate (blind profile) to the recruiting manager of an AmLaw100 firm. A few hours later, I get a phone call from her. She asks  me, “Are you working for us or against us? I know that you sent an email to one of our associates recently (trying to entice them away).”

Now I feel that she won’t consider my candidate, mostly out of spite. Here are the facts:

Candidates, Viewpoint

To Get Good Feedback, Know When to Keep Your Mouth Shut



Confidentilaity - free

Our reputation and success as recruiters are closely tied to confidentiality. We need to keep the confidentiality of both our candidates and clients.

When I reach out for G2 (a government term meaning intelligence) on a candidate or client, the individual giving me information has to trust that I will keep his comments to myself and that I will use this information judiciously and never put him in jeopardy. I always tell people that conversations with recruiters are like conversations with your attorney, physician, or religious leader. We need to know when to keep our mouths shut because breaching confidentiality may cause your client or candidate (or both) never to trust, or work with, you again.

I was glued to Matt Lowney’s article (“Why You Don’t Get Better Client Feedback”). He told the story of a candidate he’d interviewed who didn’t seem interested in the opportunity, and even seemed “annoyed” with some of the questions Matt asked in the meeting. He explained that he gave

Ask Barb

The Magic Question That Can Prevent a Falloff or Turndown



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

We have deals blowing up more now than ever before. Our IT candidates know they are in demand and constantly change their minds, disappear, and turn down offers. Our clients don’t want to hear our excuses when we explain we have no control over what our candidates ultimately decide to do or not to do. How do we make our clients realize they need to be more realistic with their expectations, and also have to realize we’re dealing with people who often change their mind? We’re not miracle workers, we’re recruiters.

Stephen Z., Dallas, TX

Dear Stephen:

You can’t make your clients lower their expectations. They will never be

Cold Calling, Jeff's On Call!, Relationships

How To Turn Client Criticism Into A Win



Placements and the law logo

Although it’s rarely discussed openly, the most pervasive problem in doing search is internalizing criticism from employers. It causes recruiter burnout, limits options, stifles creativity and results in low self-esteem.

That is why overcoming objections is such an important part of any placement training program. But overcoming objections doesn’t overcome the effects of destructive criticism. This PTL column will show you how to do so and improve your bottom line.

Let’s start with your role in the placement process. With few exceptions, the relationships between the recruiter and the client are transitory. You’re in a “what have you done for me lately” business. You’re only as good as your last placement. Don’t perform, suffer a massive ego stroke, or overcharge and you’ll be history. This is a reality of business; it’s a value-for-value relationship. That’s why you charge for your services, and that’s why they pay. For this reason, satisfied clients are the key to a satisfied, successful you.

Ask Barb, For Managers

Forget Control. Think Rapport



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I’ve owned my business for over 25 years and have always been successful at developing client and candidate control. That has not been the case recently. Our candidates and clients are changing their minds more than ever before. It’s become impossible to control their actions.

Sylia D.
San Jose, CA

Dear Sylia:

I have never believed that we can control clients or candidates. What is effective is your ability to develop rapport based on trust. Technology and the availability of information and networking has made it easier for our candidates to find other opportunities and our clients to identify other resources.

Uncategorized

Learn to Be Charismatic and Sales Will Follow



2 minute recruiting

Recruiters who possess a high degree of self-confidence and charisma tend to dominate their market and out perform their competitors. They negotiate higher fees, gain access to elite clients, and land highly sought after retainers. Much of their marketing is done for them; new clients seek them out because their reputation precedes them.

Charisma gets people to like you, trust you, and want to be led by you. It can determine whether you’re seen as a follower or leader, whether your ideas get adopted, and how effectively your projects are implemented. It makes people want to help you achieve your goals.

But what if you don’t consider yourself naturally charismatic? What if it seems like a magical quality that only a lucky few are born with? I recently created a seminar called “The Charismatic Recruiterbecause, the truth is, most of us (myself included) don’t feel that we possess this innate charm that draws people to us naturally.

Candidates

Want to Recruit Me? Here’s What It Takes For Me to Respond



fordyce-default

bigstock-Job-Employee-Man-Candidate-Sea-8608360I recently met a “very placeable candidate” (some call them most placeable candidate) and gained intriguing insider knowledge that will show you how important trust is between a candidate and a recruiter.

To give you an overview, a VPC has great technical, communication, and leadership skills, with a personality that fits well with any company. Recruiters love meeting VPCs, but we also know they are called and emailed by many recruiters – constantly.

The VPC I connected with said she receives 50-100 calls andemails each week from local IT recruiters. I had to ask, “What do you with all those calls and emails?”

Relationships, Viewpoint

If All You Want Is To Sell Me, Don’t Bother



fordyce-default

Vendor: A person who sells something

Partner: An ally or companion

What’s the difference between a staffing agency being a vendor or a partner?

The key is how both hiring managers and agency recruiters respect the relationship. Hiring managers can’t get upset at the quality of candidates they receive when they treat recruiters like dirt. And staffing agencies cannot be upset when they treat the recruiting process like a sales transaction.

Ask Barb, Relationships

It’s Not Control; It’s A Relationship



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

How can I establish candidate control faster? My candidates are not providing me with information; they are not calling me back after interviews, and seem to change their minds on priorities without informing me. I’ve had three offers turned down in the past 30 days. I’m tired of working for nothing. It’s almost like this younger generation has no respect for what I can do for them, and think they know more than me.

Sylvia M., Atlanta, GA

Dear Sylvia:

First of all, I don’t believe you can establish candidate control.

Ask Barb

Your Candidates Want Choices



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I feel more and more that we are competing with the job boards, LinkedIn and social media for our candidates. By the time we get them through an interviewing process, they’ve found another job. I’m not seeing all of this technology as helpful. I’m seeing it as a threat. How can we compete, when it’s so easy for our candidates to find interviews on their own?

Susan P.

Ft. Meyers, FL

Dear Susan: