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The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'personalproductivity'

For Managers

Get Rid of These 10 Undercover Time-Wasting Over-Workers



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Recruiters are always wondering how we’re able to respond so quickly on a national basis. Believe it or not, we work regular hours. I learned the techniques when I was managing a recruiting office.

You can too, if you:

  • Understand where your non-productive time is spent and;
  • Overhaul your procedures.

All the time-management seminars, workshops, books, calendars, timers, alarms, buzzers and electronic voices in the world won’t help you. They’re just pea-shooters in the war against time. Your problem isn’t on the battlefield, it’s in the war room — right there in your office.

Here are the 10 biggest undercover over-workers:

Ask Barb

How 10% Will Get You 30%



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I work a contingency engineering direct desk and have produced between $250,00 and $275,000 for the past five years. When I focus on producing more, I beat my monthly average, but then the next month I crash and burn. I’m getting married next year and want to earn more. What do I need to change in order to consistently produce more?

Susan F.
San Jose, CA

You Can Motivate You

Dear Susan:

The great news here is you have accomplished consistent production and

Social Media, Viewpoint

What Unplugging Can Do For Your Career



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In an age of technology where refrigerators can talk to smartphones and cars can parallel park themselves, how are we supposed to unplug? Giving up Facebook or putting down our smart phones seems just about impossible given the amount of connectivity we’ve become accustomed to. But is it good for us to be that connected all of the time?

Think about how much time you spend every day scrolling through a social network (or three), checking your email, or just checking your cell phone in general (even if it hasn’t rung). For instance, as I write this blog, my cell phone is sitting loyally by my side, patiently waiting for the next time I receive an email or a text from one of my kids. My phone is never far from my side, and leaving a notification waiting seems to be getting more and more difficult. Confessions of a smartphone user.

Motivation

Workplace Mindfulness: A Way to Be More Productive With Less Stress



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Google, eBay, Intel and General Mills offer classes on it. So do Harvard Business School, Ross School of Business and Claremont Graduate University, among other campuses. Mindfulness is not just a corporate trend, but a proven method for success.

Mindfulness – being focused and fully present in the here and now – is good for individuals and good for a business’s bottom line.

How can people practice it in a workplace where multitasking is the norm, and concerns for future profits can add to workplace stress?

Even if a company doesn’t make it part of the culture, employees and managers can substitute their multitasking habits with mindfulness in order to reduce stress and increase productivity.

Ask Barb, Motivation

Need More Balance? Discuss it With the Boss



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I’ve been a big biller for most of my career. I just returned from maternity leave and I find I don’t want to put in the effort or hours it takes to become a top producer. I tried to explain this to my manager, but he is convinced I’m just sleep-deprived and will return to being his #1 producer this year. It’s not going to happen, my priorities have changed and my husband earns great money, so I don’t need to earn what I’ve earned in the past.

I don’t want to quit, but I’d rather work for someone who is not pressuring me on a daily basis to produce numbers I feel are unreasonable considering I have a four-month-old daughter. My co-workers even feel my manager is out of line. I know you were a single mom and would really value your advice.

Judy C.
New York, NY
Uncategorized

How to Say No When They Ask “Got a Minute”



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Got a minute?

The fact is, unless you are a great rarity today, you not only don’t have a minute, you have a yawning deficit of minutes. There is work unfinished on your desk. You have personal aspirations of all kinds that you never find time for and obligations you barely find time for. You’re already stretched for time, so no, you don’t have a minute.

Yet when almost anybody asks, “Got a minute?” you automatically answer, “Sure, how can I help?”

How do you stop doing that?

Ask Barb

Manage by Numbers and You’ll Hit Them



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

Our sales are inconsistent and even my managers have accepted the fact that we will have at least one flat month every quarter. That’s four flat months out of the year and obviously my expenses don’t decrease during those flat months. I’m out of answers on how to get more consistent production out of our team.

I know you speak at many conferences and do some in-house training and consulting with owners. Because of your exposure to companies all over the world in our profession, do you agree that flat months are just a reality of our business?

Donna F.
Houston, TX

Dear Donna:

I don’t believe that you should accept the fact that every year you are going to have four flat months. This proves the concept: If you think you can or if you think you can’t you’re right! The only way to guarantee consistent production is for everyone to hit their individual result standards on a daily basis.

Often, a flat month follows a record month because during the record month your sales team is focused on prepping, debriefing, closing, and celebrating. They stop doing the basics that guarantee consistent production (recruiting, marketing, presentations, etc.).

If you monitor sendout totals, you can accurately predict production. It is extremely important for you to manage by numbers because numbers don’t lie. When your team is having a great time, encourage them to stay on the telephone because they are on a high and will obtain great results.

Barbara J. Bruno, CPC, CTS

How-To, Motivation

The 3 Elements Of A Proactive Daily Plan



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When I first started in the business back in 1994, I was fortunate to hear Peter Leffkowitz speak at a recruiting seminar in Los Angeles. One of the sections of his training that particularly stood out to me was his approach to time management and planning. He described the two main ways that recruiters tend to work a desk:

Reactively working a desk: This is the method that 80% of recruiters use to work a desk. This method can best be described as S-T-R-E-S-S. This is the land of soaring peaks followed by deep, dark valleys. It entails little planning, sporadic execution and lots of reacting.

Reacting to incoming email, incoming calls, interruptions, client demands etc. It involves chasing deals, working from adrenaline and a production-oriented focus. Essentially it’s a neurotic way to work a desk and often leads to burnout.

Proactively working a desk: This is the method that 20% of recruiters use to work a desk. There is a subtle but powerful difference in focus. Instead of simply focusing on production, proactive recruiters concentrate on building the activity that generates production. This involves planning and then executing from a proactive stance.

Motivation

‘Time At Work’ Is Not a Success Metric



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image source: Letheravensoar

image source: Letheravensoar

He can’t be serious, Jim thought. Jim been recruited away from a Fortune 500 firm by a fast-growing start-up, and it was his first day. The president of the company had just handed him a BlackBerry and said, “Keep this with you at all times.”

Really?

That Saturday morning, one of the founders sent an e-mail to the senior leadership team. By 5:00 p.m., there were more than 30 replies.

Jim soon learned that at this company, there was no concept of detachment from work. He grieved the loss bitterly, and his friends would mock him for stepping out of the bar to check e-mail at 10:00 p.m. while they were out for a few pints of beer. In a matter of months, Jim’s job began to seriously interfere with his relationship with his wife.

Ask Barb

One Word Advice: Sendouts, Sendouts, Sendouts



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I recently attended a conference where you participated on a panel. I felt you were the most honest and straightforward person on the panel, and loved your honesty. It was refreshing to hear a trainer who admits they were not an instant success. I had a terrible first year, but I’m doing much better now and would love to ask you for the best advice you would offer someone trying to increase their production and income.

Thank you for always being authentic and for always giving us ideas we can easily use.

Kathy P.
Indianapolis, IN

Dear Kathy: