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Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'Jeff Allen'

Jeff's On Call!

Have More JOs Than You Can Fill? Hire A Freelancer. Here’s How



Placements and the law logo

Let’s face it. You can’t accept every search. You can’t search and supervise at the same time either. And you certainly can’t afford to have search specialists on your payroll, hoping the right job order comes along. Placement doesn’t work like that.

The result is that you take more JO’s than you can bill — “backup JO’s” just in case you find someone. But you don’t. Some other recruiter does.

Enter the freelancer — a “consultant’s consultant” who does “brokered” searches on a project (one-time) basis.

Freelancers are low-overhead, low-profile recruiters who usually work out of their homes. They don’t market their services to employers, and don’t solicit job orders. Instead, they depend on visible brokers like you to refer search business. This allows them the flexibility to recruit on their own schedule. In fact, many are employed management and technical types who moonlight after hours.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Collecting When There’s a No-Fee Policy



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We don’t pay fees.

How Client Pays:

Sometimes it’s for “certain positions,” sometimes it’s not. Sometimes it’s “company policy,” sometimes it’s personal preference. Sometimes it’s in writing, sometimes it’s not. Sometimes it’s a low fee ceiling, sometimes it’s

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

The Candidate Can’t Waive Your Fee



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate assured us you weren’t representing him.

How Client Pays:

There are three ways this attempted waiver of the fee occurs:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

“Fee’s Too High” Is No Defense When You Have a Contract



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The fee’s too high.

How Client Pays:

Recruiters laugh or get angry at the “fee’s too high” position. But courts will arbitrarily reduce placement fees in the name of equity (fairness) unless there is a written, signed, or otherwise fully accepted contract introduced into evidence.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

No Proof Your Fee Schedule Was Accepted? You Lose



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The fee schedule wasn’t received.

How Client Pays:

You’ve probably wondered where all those undelivered emails and letters with fee schedules went.

Business, Jeff's On Call!

What You Need to Know About Selling Your Placement Business Through A Broker



Placements and the law logo

Some days it seems that everyone in the placement business is looking for ways to leave it. When you’re one of them, you’ll need to know about that mysterious person called a “business broker.” He or she can really help.

Here are the eight questions we’re most asked about business brokers, and the answers we give:

1. What is a business broker?

The obvious answer is that it’s someone who introduces a prospective buyer of a business to a seller, and arranges a sale of the business for a fee. However, the real answers are:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Collecting When the Candidate Says “No Charge”



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate said you wouldn’t charge anything.

How Client Pays:

This is one of those naive “defenses” only a foolish fee-fighter would allege.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Why Adam & Eve Won’t Get the Fee (and Neither Will You)



ask-jeff4

Hello Jeff,

As an avid follower of yours, I’m constantly learning the do’s and don’ts of executive search. Thank you for this vital information!

I can’t imagine this is the first question of this kind. But if anyone can help me, it’s you.

My client engaged me in an a VP contingency search for which I introduced a VP from a similar business. It took much convincing to ignite the interest of this candidate and my client was very pleased with the introduction. They interviewed my candidate and formed quite a quick bond — several meetings later, the VP candidate received a verbal offer. After much contemplation, the candidate felt she was not ready to leave her employer for a vertical move and she declined the position.

Here’s where it gets dicey: in lieu of accepting the job offer, my candidate offered up a referral — one of her subordinates who she felt was ready to advance into a VP role. So, in essence the VP candidate who I sent to my client, in turn directly referred a candidate to my client who they ultimately hired.

How-To, Jeff's On Call!

7 Ways to Get Hiring Managers to Say Yes



Placements and the law logo

Require the client to listen to a presentation.

“Oh Jeff, you sound so forceful!”

I really am about this. I’ll show you how to make that hirer listen!

Let’s start with the basics: It costs a hiring authority time, effort, and eventually, money, to hire a candidate. Initially, you compete with the inner thoughts and feelings occupying his or her attention. Then she has to relate your presentation to some prior experience to picture the candidate. As if that’s not enough, she also has to be patient. You’re slowly painting a picture, one brushstroke at a time. But it’s received hundreds of times faster.

There’s much that can be done to get the client to listen more attentively to a presentation. Placement is an art, not a science. Since you’re in charge of each brushstroke you paint, you control strokes and select the colors. This PTL is designed to show you the seven techniques.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Fee Agreements End the ‘Free Sample’ Defense



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We thought the referral was a free sample.

How Client Pays:

Some fee-avoiders think that the more outrageous the lie, the more likely it will be believed.