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Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'Jeff Allen'

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Collecting When the Candidate Says “No Charge”



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate said you wouldn’t charge anything.

How Client Pays:

This is one of those naive “defenses” only a foolish fee-fighter would allege.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Why Adam & Eve Won’t Get the Fee (and Neither Will You)



ask-jeff4

Hello Jeff,

As an avid follower of yours, I’m constantly learning the do’s and don’ts of executive search. Thank you for this vital information!

I can’t imagine this is the first question of this kind. But if anyone can help me, it’s you.

My client engaged me in an a VP contingency search for which I introduced a VP from a similar business. It took much convincing to ignite the interest of this candidate and my client was very pleased with the introduction. They interviewed my candidate and formed quite a quick bond — several meetings later, the VP candidate received a verbal offer. After much contemplation, the candidate felt she was not ready to leave her employer for a vertical move and she declined the position.

Here’s where it gets dicey: in lieu of accepting the job offer, my candidate offered up a referral — one of her subordinates who she felt was ready to advance into a VP role. So, in essence the VP candidate who I sent to my client, in turn directly referred a candidate to my client who they ultimately hired.

How-To, Jeff's On Call!

7 Ways to Get Hiring Managers to Say Yes



Placements and the law logo

Require the client to listen to a presentation.

“Oh Jeff, you sound so forceful!”

I really am about this. I’ll show you how to make that hirer listen!

Let’s start with the basics: It costs a hiring authority time, effort, and eventually, money, to hire a candidate. Initially, you compete with the inner thoughts and feelings occupying his or her attention. Then she has to relate your presentation to some prior experience to picture the candidate. As if that’s not enough, she also has to be patient. You’re slowly painting a picture, one brushstroke at a time. But it’s received hundreds of times faster.

There’s much that can be done to get the client to listen more attentively to a presentation. Placement is an art, not a science. Since you’re in charge of each brushstroke you paint, you control strokes and select the colors. This PTL is designed to show you the seven techniques.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Fee Agreements End the ‘Free Sample’ Defense



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We thought the referral was a free sample.

How Client Pays:

Some fee-avoiders think that the more outrageous the lie, the more likely it will be believed.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Whose Fee? Phantom Recruiters and Contract Terminations



ask-jeff4

Dear Jeff,

I have been in the industry for over 15 years recruiting across Europe and the Middle East, permanent search and selection for senior management up to board level positions across a variety of industries.

My team and I always look out for your column with intense interest. Even after 15 years in the industry I constantly learn new insights to improve our business and overcome the more unusual challenges. Thank you for that, because we could never get the information anywhere else at any price.

We have a long-standing client that asked us to start a contingent search a few months ago. We sourced a candidate, set up interviews, and finally an offer has been accepted. However they now realize the CV was

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

No ‘Mistake” If You Caused the Hire



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

There was a mistake about who referred the candidate.

How Client Pays:

Jeff's On Call!

Instant Falloff? Worry About Protection, Not Collection



ask-jeff4

Hi Jeff,

I am a big fan of yours, and have followed the Jeff’s On Call! column for years.

We just just heard something very disturbing, and need your help.

Our client is in in Pennsylvania, and we made two placements with them in the past. We were paid with no problems.

Our most recent hire is a controller who lives here in Florida and was expecting a moving company to arrive tomorrow for relocation to her new position. She just received an email from our client telling her that they lost a big contract, and decided not to have her start with them. She is furious, as you might expect.

Jeff's On Call!

Promissory Estoppel: The Way You Get Paid When the Client Changes Things



ask-jeff4

Hi Jeff,

I have learned a great deal from your “Jeff’s On Call!” column and also from your National Placement Law Center Fee Collection Guide. The column is certainly a place where rookies and seasoned veterans alike can get useful tips for the search industry.

I am a veteran recruiter with over 20 years experience. I have done both retained and contingency search.

We have finished an extensive (3+ month) contingency search on an exclusive basis. During the search, the client sent names for us to screen and recruit. Of course one of these candidates landed the position after we screened, recruited, referred, and set up the initial interview. The client has offered to pay only a partial fee since they sent us the name of the candidate.

Unfortunately, I believe this will end up being hashed out in court. Will it matter what the reason is for the sending of the names to our firm? What legal theories does this case center on?

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Ask For An Explanation, But Send Them Only An Invoice



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We didn’t hire, but referred the candidate to someone else.

How Client Pays:

Since the client isn’t in the placement business, you’ll be unable to show that it

How-To, Jeff's On Call!

A Four Step Program to Improving Your Phone Voice



Placements and the law logo

The phone voice is almost everything in making placements. Even in personal meetings, 38% of the meaning is conveyed by the voice. Surprisingly, the words themselves only convey 23%. What you convey it is more important than what you say.

Since recruiters (and lawyers) talk so much, they tend to become deaf to their own voices. We practice a four-step program of simple voice improvement techniques. We’ve achieved unbelievable results in negotiation and trial using them. Since I introduced them to our favorite recruiters they’ve made more placements. It’ll work for you too.

Let’s get started!