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The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'clientmanagement'

How-To, Relationships

When Enough is Enough, Danny Says Use “Disruptive Honesty”



according to Danny logo

Dear Danny,

A client is not keeping its commitment to the process (not getting back quickly after the final on site round of interviews, committing to provide an offer within two days of these interviews, foot dragging, making repeated commitments and then breaking them).

I push, and explain it sends a bad signal to the candidate and is not what they agreed to. As part of this, I’m also concerned that the client makes me look bad to our candidate and, that if they’re marketable elsewhere, they will be hesitant to work with us as a result of being jerked around by the first client we put them in to.

Ask Barb

Manage Client Expectations by Stating Your Own



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I own a contingency direct placement firm and specialize in IT. It’s more difficult than ever to surface top talent. Unfortunately, even when we do surface great candidates, our clients screen out most of the candidates we present.

Often the specs they give us are impossible to fill, so we surface the best talent available, but they want the “perfect” person which doesn’t exist in this market. Any ideas on how we can put pressure on our clients?

Stephen M.
San Francisco, CA
Closing

Don’t Let the Client Bulldoze You Into Making the Offer



Under pressure - free

Under pressure - freeYou’ve worked hard and spent weeks assessing the client’s needs and interviewing potential candidates. Finally the perfect match has been found and the client is anxious to have your candidate come onboard. As recruiters it is our moment of shining glory. The stars have aligned and we stand at the apex of everything we are about and work for. Then the client puts the entire process into a tailspin by doing the unthinkable— insisting that they make the job offer to the applicant.

STOP! Do not let this happen. Nothing could be worse for the client, the candidate or for you!

Ask Barb

Your Job Is To Figure Out What Will Make a Match



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:
I’ve about had it with my candidates and clients. They are making such awful decisions and saying things that are ridiculous. How do I get them to change their attitudes and decisions without offending them?

Mary Z.
Detroit, MI

Dear Mary:
If you want to experience a high level of success at recruiting, you need to learn two very important lessons:

  • It is not your job to agree or disagree with your clients.
  • It is not your job to agree or disagree with your candidates.

In fact, neither of them welcomes your opinion and often don’t follow your advice. The truth is you never really know who your clients will hire. You can’t screen for chemistry, company culture, and personality.

On the client side, it is your job to listen to the feedback you get from your client and figure out exactly what type of talent they will hire.

On the candidate side, it is your job to present an opportunity that hits this candidate’s hot buttons so they will accept an offer when it is extended. You deal with human beings on both sides of the sale who change their minds. It’s just easier to work with them when you learn not to agree or disagree with them, but rather figure out what will lead them up to an offer and acceptance.

Barbara J. Bruno, CPC, CTS

Business Development, Relationships

To Work With Great Clients, Teach Them To Be Great



RecruiterU

Are you frustrated with the way most of your clients treat you? Frustrated with their process? Fees? Terms? Do you ever wonder why we are treated the same poor way over and over?

We often mistakenly think if we speak to enough prospects and fill enough job orders an ideal client that “gets it” will emerge. Sure, that happens once in a while, but not enough to create a predictable, sustainable business full of companies you LOVE working for.

After years of being a frustrated recruiter myself I began to strategically identify what the key elements of a great client look like for me.

How-To, Viewpoint

Help Your Client Avoid These Mistakes As You Fight the New Talent Battles



Talent on stage

Talent on stageWe speak of ‘The War for Talent’ – the perfect storm at the intersection of ballooning demand and limited supply, with no viable solutions but to accept mediocrity or fight for the best. Of course, this is not a new phenomenon, nor is it unique to any one field or industry, even if IT is today’s frontline.

Now, we are shifting toward a candidate-driven “seller’s market” for executives.

No organization can excel without great leadership. Most chief executives agree that for an entity to ascend to and perform at an optimal level, it must attract and retain the best leaders possible. Some, however, don’t align their own recruiting processes with this fundamental truth.

Viewpoint

Chase That Purple Squirrel Too Long and You Might Wind Up With None



purple squirrel

purple squirrelA “purple squirrel” is a metaphor in the recruiting business for that impossibly hard to find “perfect” candidate that our client asks for.

The request is preceded by comments like, “We just can’t make a mistake!” ”We need to find the perfect candidate!” And what can be more damaging to your business than a bad hire? Not much, but the failure to make a critical hire in a timely manner is at least a close second. Productivity is lost, precious momentum is squandered, and increasingly hard-to-find candidates slip away.

Based on our experience here at Babich, we often see perfect become the enemy of “great” when our clients focus on searches for purple squirrels. We suggest that even if perfect candidates exist, they are nearly impossible to find.

Business Development, Cold Calling, How-To

If the Front Door Doesn’t Open, Try Going Around Back



Listening ear girl - free digital

Spying eye - freedigitalThere are numerous definitions for the term “back channels” if you were to look this up on the internet. A back channel can be as simple as students or conference attendees using IRC or instant chat to discuss a lecture among themselves. The lecture or talk is the “front channel” (formal presentation) while the chatter being the back channel.

A back channel can also be attendees of a webinar or conference posting comments to each other as the speaker is presenting.

Taking a publicly posted commentary on Facebook, and continuing the dialogue on instant messaging (Facebook messaging) can be another back channel. I’d venture to guess there’s more dialogue going on via private messaging than there is in the visible status update sections as behind-the-scenes people are willing to divulge their opinions more openly and discuss topics of a sensitive nature.

As a result the conversations are often livelier and more informative in the back channels than they are in the formal mode. The military and federal government state departments use back channels for obtaining tips from informants.

Business

Contingency vs. Retained Search: A Client’s Perspective



bigstock-Job-Employee-Man-Candidate-Sea-8608360

bigstock-Job-Employee-Man-Candidate-Sea-8608360Why do most external recruiters work on a contingency basis? And why does most retained work happen at the executive level? As a client, I receive better focus and (typically) better results from retained partners. And the client-agency relationship feels more like, well, a relationship. I also assume that most contingency recruiters would rather work on a retained basis knowing they are going to get paid for their work.

Following that line of thought I’ve wondered why there isn’t more retained work at the mid-management level. As a client I get better focus because the recruiter knows I have some skin in the game, and the recruiter is happy because, well, she knows she’s going to get paid. Perhaps top-tier executive retained search firms don’t want to work on these roles because they are less lucrative. However, I tend to think that mid-level retained work would happen if there was a more robust client need.

Ask Barb, Business Development, Relationships

Three Questions Your Clients Will Never Ask, But You Have to Answer



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

My owner has me schedule client visits and client lunches to obtain their temp assignments. I almost always leave their office or the restaurant with no orders and feel this is a waste of my time. Do you think face-to-face meetings are important, or do you feel telephone calls can provide you with more results?

Sophie F

Oakbrook IL