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The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Articles tagged 'candidates'

Candidates

Want to Recruit Me? Here’s What It Takes For Me to Respond



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bigstock-Job-Employee-Man-Candidate-Sea-8608360I recently met a “very placeable candidate” (some call them most placeable candidate) and gained intriguing insider knowledge that will show you how important trust is between a candidate and a recruiter.

To give you an overview, a VPC has great technical, communication, and leadership skills, with a personality that fits well with any company. Recruiters love meeting VPCs, but we also know they are called and emailed by many recruiters – constantly.

The VPC I connected with said she receives 50-100 calls andemails each week from local IT recruiters. I had to ask, “What do you with all those calls and emails?”

How-To

Skills Can Be Taught, But Attitude is Forever



Positive Attitude

Positive AttitudeWhen hiring for a new position, all employers want to recruit the most talented and skilled candidates possible – preferably with a great attitude too. In reality, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find potential hires who “have it all.” All too frequently, these “have it all” individuals aren’t actively seeking a move.

Instead, employers are faced with an ever decreasing talent pool where the right combination of attitude, culture fit, and skills are difficult to find in one person.

In the final decision making process, which one is the most important?

Sourcing

10 More Reasons Why You Should Consider the ‘Overqualified’



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overqualified-150x120Editor’s note: This is the second of two posts offering 20 reasons why ‘overqualified’ candidates make good hires. This article first appeared as a single post on our sister site, ERE.net. Though aimed at corporate recruiters, it offers good advice and powerful ammunition for search consultants when discussing great, if ‘overqualified’ candidates with hiring managers and HR contacts. With the talent pool for top performers getting smaller every day, passing up qualified candidates because of too much experience or too impressive a previous title can mean the loss of the placement and the fee.

Yesterday, I listed 10 reasons hire the overqualified candidate. Today, I’ll list 10 more.

The 20 different reasons or benefits associated with hiring overqualified candidates fall into three categories: 1) recruiting/ business impacts; 2) reasons to be suspicious of qualifications; and 3) actions to mitigate potential problems. Yesterday’s 10 were all in the first category, which is where we pick up today.

Sourcing

10 Reasons to Ignore the Myth of the Overqualified Worker



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overqualified-150x120Editor’s note: This is the first of two posts offering 20 reasons why ‘overqualified’ candidates make good hires. This article first appeared as a single post on our sister site, ERE.net. Though aimed at corporate recruiters, it offers great advice and powerful ammunition for search consultants when discussing great, if ‘overqualified’ candidates with hiring managers and HR contacts. With the talent pool for top performers getting smaller every day, passing up qualified candidates because of too much experience or too impressive a previous title can mean the loss of the placement and the fee. Part two appears tomorrow.

Imagine being assigned a physician and then purposely rejecting them solely because they were overqualified for your medical situation. Well that’s exactly what happens when hiring managers reject candidates who have “too many” qualifications.

There is simply no excuse in this new era of data-based recruiting to adhere to this old wives’ tale in hiring. I have written in the past about the cost of rejecting “job jumpers” and in this article, I will focus on the false assumption that hiring candidates who are “overqualified” will result in frustrated employees who will quickly quit.

Interviews

When the Candidate Rejects Your Feedback, It May be Time to Walk Away



Defensive posture

Defensive postureThings move fast in recruiting. You speak to dozens of candidates daily, giving both positive and constructive feedback.

Today, we are studying the case of a candidate named Kelly G.

Kelly earned an MBA from Duke and worked in mid-management marketing positions at Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines over the past four

Industry News

Employers Taking More Time Than Ever to Fill Jobs



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The time to fill open positions has reached a national average of just about 25 days, the lengthiest job vacancy period in the 13 years covered by the DICE–time to fill by industryDFH Vacancy Duration Measure.

The monthly report on time to fill and recruiting efforts says that on average it took 24.9 working days (Monday-Saturday) in June to post, source, and hire a new employee. That’s more than nine days longer than it took at the height of the recession in July 2009. Then, the average was 15.3 working days.

The lengthening time to fill is having a serious impact on search firms. Data from MRINetwork says growing numbers of candidates are taking alternative offers while clients make up their mind. As a consequence, 81%

How-To

Help Your Sales Professional Craft A Better Resume



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stack of resumesAs an executive recruiter who specializes in placing IT sales and sales management talent, I am often frustrated by the quality of the resumes I receive; even from truly exceptional candidates.

The problem goes beyond the job seekers themselves, as “expertise” on resume preparation is as random as summertime showers in the Rocky Mountains. So I will provide clarity for sales professionals based upon my keen knowledge of the pressure-packed dynamics of today’s hiring climate.

The perfect resume does not exist, but the structure I suggest will get your documents noticed in the forest of paperwork being reviewed by top executives.

Industry News

Recruiter Survey: Candidates Are Driving the Job Market



Who's driving the market MRI 2014

Who's driving the market MRI 2014It’s a job seekers’ market, but hiring managers haven’t yet fully adjusted to the change, with 40% of them taking almost a month to make an offer, only to find out in many cases that their candidate is turning them down.

Better than 8 in 10 of the MRINetwork recruiters participating in the semi-annual MRINetwork Recruiter Sentiment Study said today’s employment market is candidate-driven, a 25 point jump from the 2012 study. That means the professional, executive and managerial candidates who are the majority of those recruited by MRI franchise offices can be  more demanding when it comes to the nature of the work they want, the companies they’re willing to work for, and the compensation and benefits they’ll accept.

How-To

8 Tips To Help Candidates Work Best With Recruiters



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Note: Do your candidates really know how a search consultant works and what they can do for them that they can’t do themselves? Knowing what we do, and how to best work with a headhunter makes better candidates and can lead to quicker and easier placements, not to mention less time explaining things to novice (and even more experienced, but still naive) candidates.

In this article, Jorg Stegemann explains how candidates can best work with a recruiter. Link to this article and point your candidates to it to save yourself time and headaches.

Want to know the best ways to use a headhunter? Do you know why you should use one? A good recruiter has what you have not: inside information and knowledge of jobs that will never be advertised.

Here are eight tips on how to choose a headhunter who will help you take your next career step:

How-To

The Power of Positive Candidate Coaching



My Fair Lady

My Fair LadyPerhaps on the classic movie channel you have seen the film, My Fair Lady. If you don’t recall the movie, check it out. It’s based on the play Pygmalian, by George Bernard Shaw. In the play, as well as the film, a professor takes on the challenge of transforming a girl of low social stature into a fine, articulate woman who could pass for royalty.

This tale has led to a popular theory, the Pygmalian Effect. Simplistically, this is the idea that individuals tend to rise to expectations. Why is it relevant to you? As a recruiter, encouraging candidates to rise to the occasion would be valuable to you, the candidate, and your client. We can’t work magic; however, the power of positive suggestions can do wonders when preparing a client for an interview. Fundamental advice and coaching are equally important.

Here are a few tips to start the transformation: