Welcome to The Fordyce Letter:

The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


How-To

For Managers, How-To, The Business of Recruiting

Here’s How to Plan Your ‘Grand Vision’ For 2015



Target Plan

Year-end is a great time. We get to reflect over what we have accomplished and what we have yet to do. We get to celebrate what we did right and we get to write off our failures as part of the past. And we get to redirect our efforts in a new campaign. It’s a cleansing of sort and if done properly will provide energy and direction going into the New Year.

When I look at year end planning, I believe it begins with the overall Vision Statement. This Vision Statement should describe the “grand, overall” destination of where you want to be. I learned from the great Mike Gionta, that a good Vision Statement is a one-page statement that tells a story as if it had already happened. Basically, write a one page statement as if you were 5, 10, 20 years in the future describing what your life has accomplished. Revisit this statement annually and modify it as you deem appropriate.

With the Vision Statement in place there are certain “Big Bucket” plans that will need to be addressed. They all must work together to support the Vision Statement and the execution of these plans will allow your Vision to become reality. The Big Bucket items that I believe fit our industry are:

How-To, Sourcing

How To Write An InMail Subject Line That Gets Results



InMail illustration

If you’re not getting the response you want from your InMails, the problem could be as simple as your subject line.

With LinkedIn again tightening up the consequences for InMails that go ignored, improving your response rate is not only good for your sourcing, but good for your wallet. You don’t want to get burned by LinkedIn for getting negative feedback on InMails, and you certainly don’t want to repel potential candidates by reaching out to them in ways they don’t appreciate.

With this in mind, I’d like to share some methods that have worked for me.

How-To

It’s Not A Job Order Until You Get These 7 Commitments



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The Seven Commitments are important in gauging how “hot” a job order is. You need to verify the commitments in every conversation, using various different approaches. If you don’t have all the commitments, it does not mean you should not work the job order, it means you should figure out how to get the client commitment.

1. Hiring manager contact

Only the hiring manager has an emotional investment and feels a sense of urgency to get results. Second-hand information makes it impossible for you to impact the decision-maker and quality is compromised by inaccurate information. Providing a quality service and your ability to close depend on hiring manager contact.

How-To, Jeff's On Call!

7 Ways to Get Hiring Managers to Say Yes



Placements and the law logo

Require the client to listen to a presentation.

“Oh Jeff, you sound so forceful!”

I really am about this. I’ll show you how to make that hirer listen!

Let’s start with the basics: It costs a hiring authority time, effort, and eventually, money, to hire a candidate. Initially, you compete with the inner thoughts and feelings occupying his or her attention. Then she has to relate your presentation to some prior experience to picture the candidate. As if that’s not enough, she also has to be patient. You’re slowly painting a picture, one brushstroke at a time. But it’s received hundreds of times faster.

There’s much that can be done to get the client to listen more attentively to a presentation. Placement is an art, not a science. Since you’re in charge of each brushstroke you paint, you control strokes and select the colors. This PTL is designed to show you the seven techniques.

How-To

Counter the Brushoff With These Four Powerful Follow-Up Questions



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I was walking past my desk when the phone rang.

“Hi, I’m Jamie,” said the caller. “I can help improve your website.”

“Sorry, but I’m on my way to the airport,” I said. “Can you call me back next month?”

“Sure,” said Jamie, and he hung up.

A missed opportunity, I thought. And a pretty familiar scenario.

How-To

Email Ruling You? Here’s How to Fight Back



Email illustration - free

Email illustration - freeAll the technology in the world will not help you if you cannot manage your time or tasks. Recruiting is a complex sale, but the process is not rocket science. More than anything it requires organization and focus. Keeping the process as simple as possible means you’ll produce more, better and faster.

Without question, the top culprit for stealing your time is email. Even in this age of tweets and texts, in the business world, email is still king and it’s easy to find statistics that show the average American office worker wastes as much as 40% of their day lost in email. So you have to ask yourself: Is email running your life or your company?

Learning to rein in and control the email beast is crucial for our employees and for us. Don’t assume recruiters and support staff automatically know how to efficiently organize their email or their time. While nobody wants to feel micro-managed, at least put some suggested policies in place to teach your people the value and advantages to well-managed email and time organization. Below are some ideas I have discovered and implemented over the years.

How-To

4 Tips to More Effective Job Ads



infojobs toilet paper dispenser ad

infojobs toilet paper dispenser adThe writing process for a job advertisement should be the same as that of any other advertisement: Begin with identifying your customer.

Thinking of your role as a product will enable you to structure your job advertisement in a manner that best appeals to the target customer of that product, tailoring your language and the format to suit them.

Your job advertisement should meet four basic criteria:

How-To, Motivation

If All You Do Is Think You Should Be Doing Better, You Won’t



RecruiterU

When I was 16 years old I came home from a particularly hard day’s work at Burger King where I commanded a wage of $3.35 per hour. (Yeah, minimum wage.) My very loving and supportive mother asked me how my day was and I remember answering, “It was long, difficult and hot…  I should be making A LOT more to do this job!” I was expecting a supportive hug, a “Keep it up honey, they’ll recognize your worth.”… Something like that.

My mother’s response floored me; I’ll never forget it. She said in a pretty terse tone, “NO you shouldn’t! You DON’T KNOW ANYTHING YET!”

Wow! I felt the blood drain from my face and felt very humbled and a bit humiliated, honestly.

As Tim Russert wrote, “The older I get the smarter my father  seems to get.” Substitute ‘mother’ in that sentence and that is how I feel now. You

How-To

Skills Can Be Taught, But Attitude is Forever



Positive Attitude

Positive AttitudeWhen hiring for a new position, all employers want to recruit the most talented and skilled candidates possible – preferably with a great attitude too. In reality, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find potential hires who “have it all.” All too frequently, these “have it all” individuals aren’t actively seeking a move.

Instead, employers are faced with an ever decreasing talent pool where the right combination of attitude, culture fit, and skills are difficult to find in one person.

In the final decision making process, which one is the most important?

How-To

Agreements, Slumps, and Offers



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Topic 1: Should you start a search without a signed agreement?

We were all likely taught that you should never start a search without a signed agreement. This makes good sense for many obvious reasons. However, what do you do if a hiring manager authorizes you to send people for a search but does not return your agreement promptly?

Hiring authorities (like all of us) only do things when it is obvious that it will benefit them in a tangible way. Reading a contract in detail before they receive a candidate is not always at the top of their priority list. Often it is your presentation of a star candidate that provides the motivation for the manager to sign your agreement.