Welcome to The Fordyce Letter:

The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Fees

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

You Said You Were Doing This As a Favor



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

You said you wouldn’t bill us if we hired the candidate.

How Client Pays:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Ask For An Explanation, But Send Them Only An Invoice



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We didn’t hire, but referred the candidate to someone else.

How Client Pays:

Since the client isn’t in the placement business, you’ll be unable to show that it

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

The “Other Division” Fee-Avoiding Forward Pass



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate was hired by another division.

How Client Pays:

This is a “forward pass” situation — sendout to A, hire by B.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Why You Should Never Say “But For” In A Fee-Fight



ask-jeff4

Hi Jeff,

Thanks for all the help you give through your column in The Fordyce Letter and elsewhere. I enjoy reading your advice in the Jeff’s On Call! column and would appreciate any help you could offer about a current situation.

I’ve been in personnel consulting business since 1983 and have some long-standing relationships with other colleagues and friends in our specialty area.

Currently, a situation has come up between me and one of these colleagues, Dean, and we are having difficulty resolving it so it is a “win-win” agreement.

Here’s the scenario:

Dean submitted a candidate back in August/September 2013 on a job order he took for a position at a company that we both do work for from time to time. The client did not hire the candidate at that time for that position. Dean’s submittal policy gives him credit for the referral for 12 months from the time of the initial referral.

Ask Barb, Fees

Do Splits Only With People You Know



Ask Barb

Dear Barb,

At the end of last year, I was contacted by a recruiter in New York for assistance on a search they were working. Bottom line is that I provided the candidate who was eventually hired by their client. My candidate started his new job and is doing very well.

Our agreement was that I would be paid 50% of the $32,500 placement fee when cash came in. It is 120 days later and I still have not been paid. The owner of the recruiting firm is not returning my calls. The recruiter I worked with offered to send me $2,500 toward what they owe me, which just adds insult to injury.

If I go to an attorney, I’ll end up losing a good portion of the monies collected. What would you advise me to do in this situation? I’m not a bank and want the $16,250 I’m owed. This is the first time I’ve done a split with another firm and it’s going to be the last.

Frank Z.

Austin, TX

Dear Frank,

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Forget That Fee If You Sent Contact Info



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

There was prior contact with the candidate.

How Client Pays:

“Exclusive” contingency-fee job orders don’t exist. But even assuming you think you’ve got one, it doesn’t exclude direct contact with the candidate. So you’re truly trusting when you:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Send Only ‘Blind’ Resumes Or You May See Your Fee Runaway



ask-jeff4

Mr. Allen,

Hello, it is good to be ‘speaking’ with you. I was told of your website when I first began in the executive search business many years ago, and I have benefited from visiting your site again, recently, by being able to read the scenarios that occur in our business.

In particular I appreciate your Q & A about referring resumes and doing so in a manner that protects us from losing a fee in the referral process. A recent experience has taught me I need to more closely follow your suggestions about masking a candidate’s identity, and so I shall.

I’ve been in recruiting for a few different industries since 1980: healthcare, insurance, manufacturing. and have done not only contingency but also retained searches.

Recently, after being away from the search business for a few years I’ve discovered something new to me. On many occasions I will contact an executive in a company, make a candidate presentation, and that executive will agree to receive and review the candidate’s resume. I also have on many occasions arranged for that executive’s ‘gatekeeper’ to receive a candidate’s resume (with the understanding I am in the search business and that a fee would apply upon hire of the referred candidate), and subsequently print it and put on that executive’s desk for review. (This has worked and gotten me a hire although I’m thinking you probably don’t approve.)

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

“He said,” “She said” Don’t Count In Fee Fights



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. Over the last 18 months, he’s documented one a week. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

You said you wouldn’t bill us if we hired the candidate.

How Client Pays:

The usual ruses are that you said this was a favor to the candidate; it was a level you didn’t work, or a discipline outside your field.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Haunt Your Candidate When the Employer Claims Employee Referral



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse that you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The hire was through an employee referral.

How Client Pays:

Employee referrals are among the easiest and most common fee-avoidance moves. Here’s how they do it:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Your Total Fee Is Totally Due (If Your Fee Schedule Is Totally Clear)



ask-jeff4

Dear Jeff,

Love your column, Jeff’s on Call! Really benefited from the advice and your column!

Our company is a headhunting company based in the Netherlands, which works globally in placing lawyers with high end firms. I am the owner; been doing this for seven years.

My candidate received an offer by my client. She has accepted it and will start with company within two months. Now, she will be working 36 hours per week in the beginning, and that may elope to 40 hours as is stipulated in the contract.

Discussion with client: They only want to pay fee based on 36 hrs because she will be working that.