Welcome to The Fordyce Letter:

The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Fees

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

The Law Doesn’t Care Who Arranged the Interview



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

You didn’t arrange the interview.

How Client Pays:

Arranging the interview has absolutely nothing to do with your right to the fee. The legal issue is whether your activities caused the hire. You’re not

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

My Candidate Said ‘Yes’ Then ‘No.’ Is My Fee Gone?



ask-jeff2

Hi Jeff,

I’ve been reading The Fordyce Letter for over a decade and thoroughly appreciate your unique insight, recommendations to readers, and knowledge of recruitment law.

Thank you for the many years of selfless value you have offered and your searing wisdom in the midst of despair!

I have a quick situation to share hoping you might offer your advice on the matter:

I recently went through a 90+ day process with a candidate late last year for a very critical senior leadership role for our client. When I say 90 days, that’s from the time of initial presentation to the time of an offer letter in writing. The candidate also accepted in writing after squeezing (with our help) an additional $130K out of our client.  His total package (with family relocation and additional perks) was over $500K, so this was an important placement for the client and our firm.

Just as the candidate was preparing to board a plane in Florida to our client’s corporate office in Arizona for the orientation, our client received a call from him indicating that he was pulling out due to family reasons. That was his only excuse.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Collecting When There’s a No-Fee Policy



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We don’t pay fees.

How Client Pays:

Sometimes it’s for “certain positions,” sometimes it’s not. Sometimes it’s “company policy,” sometimes it’s personal preference. Sometimes it’s in writing, sometimes it’s not. Sometimes it’s a low fee ceiling, sometimes it’s

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

The Candidate Can’t Waive Your Fee



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate assured us you weren’t representing him.

How Client Pays:

There are three ways this attempted waiver of the fee occurs:

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

“Fee’s Too High” Is No Defense When You Have a Contract



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The fee’s too high.

How Client Pays:

Recruiters laugh or get angry at the “fee’s too high” position. But courts will arbitrarily reduce placement fees in the name of equity (fairness) unless there is a written, signed, or otherwise fully accepted contract introduced into evidence.

Fees, Staffing

Are You Leaving Money On the Table When Your Temp Goes Perm?



Sales shopping global - free

Sales shopping global - freeHaving trained or consulted with hundreds of temporary staffing services and contract staffing firms around this country, I am continually amazed by the variety of approaches utilized to handle the transfer of an employee from the staffing services payroll to the payroll of the client’s organization. The term most commonly used to describe this process is “Temp-to-Hire”.

My purpose here is not to discuss whether or not you should charge your client a conversion fee for the temp-to-hire process. Rather it is to provide you with a conceptual foundation on which to make that determination. Consider the following two realities.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

No Proof Your Fee Schedule Was Accepted? You Lose



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The fee schedule wasn’t received.

How Client Pays:

You’ve probably wondered where all those undelivered emails and letters with fee schedules went.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Collecting When the Candidate Says “No Charge”



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

The candidate said you wouldn’t charge anything.

How Client Pays:

This is one of those naive “defenses” only a foolish fee-fighter would allege.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Why Adam & Eve Won’t Get the Fee (and Neither Will You)



ask-jeff4

Hello Jeff,

As an avid follower of yours, I’m constantly learning the do’s and don’ts of executive search. Thank you for this vital information!

I can’t imagine this is the first question of this kind. But if anyone can help me, it’s you.

My client engaged me in an a VP contingency search for which I introduced a VP from a similar business. It took much convincing to ignite the interest of this candidate and my client was very pleased with the introduction. They interviewed my candidate and formed quite a quick bond — several meetings later, the VP candidate received a verbal offer. After much contemplation, the candidate felt she was not ready to leave her employer for a vertical move and she declined the position.

Here’s where it gets dicey: in lieu of accepting the job offer, my candidate offered up a referral — one of her subordinates who she felt was ready to advance into a VP role. So, in essence the VP candidate who I sent to my client, in turn directly referred a candidate to my client who they ultimately hired.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

Fee Agreements End the ‘Free Sample’ Defense



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

We thought the referral was a free sample.

How Client Pays:

Some fee-avoiders think that the more outrageous the lie, the more likely it will be believed.