Welcome to The Fordyce Letter:

The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


Business

Business, Business Development

The Flexible Workforce: A Trend You Can Build On



Working women concept art

The head of human resources prefaces a workforce strategy presentation by saying her program idea will lead to more focused work performed by employees; raise employee job satisfaction and retention; boost company morale and loyalty; reduce employee stress and sick days; keep business going during major weather events – and save the organization money in the process. Is there really such a silver bullet?

In terms of company profitability and employee satisfaction, absolutely.

Flexible staffing, which gives employees more control over when, where and how long they work through options like flextime, compressed work weeks, telecommuting and job sharing, is all it’s cracked up to be. It is a crucial workforce strategy when it comes to retaining mid- to executive-level professionals.

As you have likely seen and heard, flexible work options are gaining traction and acceptance in many industries, at all levels and careers.

When we think of part-time work, which in the professional world can take on many meanings (job sharing, project-based or highly specialized work), we too often equate it with working a shift at a factory or fast-food restaurant. Because historically, that is what a part-time position was. But we have evolved past that – so very far past.

For Managers

A Recruiter Job Posting Like No Other



tim sackett project

Okay, I’m adding a recruiter to my team. At hru-tech.com we do mostly engineering and IT contract recruiting, some direct placement recruiting and some project RPO work for clients around the country.

I would put my team up against anyone. They’re that good, and most are home grown! That’s right, the majority of our staff came in entry level and we smacked off that new car smell as fast as bag of Taco Bell that’s been sitting in your back seat for three weeks in the summer.

I started looking around and getting the word out a couple days ago. You would think it would be easy. I don’t really ask for a lot, but I sure know it when I ‘hear’ it! Recruiting is a pretty good gig. It’s transferable. I’ve worked in five different states, four different industries, and my recruiting skills I can take with me anywhere. It’s the one thing I can guarantee you, if you come work for me. You’ll always be able to find a job and make money. Every economy needs good recruiters.

Business, Technology

Old Technology Is Costing You Real Money In Lost Productivity



Cloud-Computing

There’s a word in the recruiting and staffing industry that nobody likes. No one wants to think about it, no one likes to talk about it, and no one really knows a good way to deal with it: downtime.

Agency downtime is one of the biggest money-wasters in an organization; it’s those few seconds or minutes lost between tasks — the time it takes your computer to boot when the system crashes, and the time spent running the same candidate search week after week. It might not sound like much, but seconds turn into minutes, which turn into hours that can quickly add up, especially across larger organizations where it’s a pervasive problem instead of being limited to just one area or division of the company.

Ask Barb, For Managers

Managers Must Teach Fishing



Ask Barb

Dear Barb:

I’m managing a team of five recruiters, but I’m still responsible for my own production. Most of my day is spent answering questions, making matches and hand-holding my recruiters. I can’t stop helping them because without my help we would not hit goals.

My owner only cares that goals are reached, but I don’t know how much longer I can carry the office or work the hours I’m working. I like the override I’m getting paid, but I could actually make more money if I only focused on my production.

Should I walk away from being a manager?

Joe D.
Topeka, KS
Business, For Managers, Viewpoint

Don’t Just Promote Your Top Biller



headphone recruiter-free-stockimages

OK, it’s time to promote. Naturally any company’s preference would be and usually is to promote from within. However, when it comes to the world of recruiting, all bets are off the table.

Recruiting is an animal unique unto itself. It is sales, business development, and sourcing all in one. No other sales-related job has such a unique structure, and requires so many different segments of the sales process to come together in order to be successful. I’ve worked with many recruiters and salespeople over the years, and have seen some great recruiters go on to become great managers and leaders in the industry. Yet at the same time, I’ve also seen some great recruiters who can’t manage their way out of a paper bag.

Business

Here’s How to Tell If Hiring Makes Financial Sense



Hiring - freedigital

Hiring - freedigitalFor a moment let’s ignore all the human and emotional aspects of hiring employees and take a close look at the numbers. In other words, why does it make financial sense to hire when: it is so difficult to train; hiring creates a huge distraction to personal production, and; knowing most of those we hire will fail?

For this article I am going to utilize my internal ratios that I have tracked over the last eight years and more than $8 million in gross revenue. To be clear, these ratios include the time as a rookie office when I opened with three green recruiters. And obviously my numbers have been significantly influenced by the great recession. I am confident that my ratios will naturally improve as I accumulate more experience in this industry and time during strong markets.

Business, For Managers

What to Measure to Recruit More Efficiently



Arrowchart-free

Arrowchart-freeConventional wisdom: You can’t manage what you don’t measure.

More than just a business world cliché, there’s plenty of evidence that measured performance does lead to a more effective organization in areas as diverse as sales, manufacturing, professional services, and recruiting.

Many organizations use metrics to understand how their sourcing and recruiting processes are working, and where there is room for improvement. But are sourcing professionals and recruiting managers measuring the right things?

For Managers

Want Better Results? Tailor Coaching to the Individual



Business training

Business trainingAs a billing manager, I never seem to have the time to coach my people consistently and they have such a limited attention span that I get the feeling, especially with my veterans, that they aren’t really into learning anyway. How do I find the balance and provide them what they need in a format that is of interest and relevant?

This question ranks as number one among owners, billing managers, and even trainers trying to find the balance between their own work load, and providing their recruiters with essential skills and knowledge. We are all experiencing work environments that are intensely more competitive and constantly changing, with business goals and objectives that continue to escalate. And while there are still seven days in a week and 24 hours in a day, our challenge is to do more with those same seven days and 24 hours then we did just a year ago.

So how do we begin to find the gift of time to coach our people? And who is to say they are open to receiving it?

Business Development

How I Nearly Lost My Business When I Stopped Marketing



hand marketing buttons-free

hand marketing buttons-freeRecently, a colleague asked me, “What was the most rewarding mistake you ever made in business?”

It’s a great question, and I quickly had an answer for him because it was an incredibly painful mistake. However, it proved to be an invaluable lesson that has served me well in the years since. I’m sharing so perhaps you can learn it the easy way.

The lesson: Don’t ever stop marketing because you think you’ve reached the point where you don’t need to. And, secondarily, believe the old adage that warns, “Don’t put all your eggs into one basket.”

My Story

Years ago, my public relations company connected with a large publishing house that served many prestigious authors. The first few of its authors we

Business Development, Cold Calling

Your Pitch Will Stand Out When It’s About Them



elevatorpitch

elevatorpitchDoes your elevator pitch sound anything like this? Hi, I’m Bob and I recruit the smartest people who can hit the ground running for the best companies in the area. And I can do the same for you.”

Not too bad?

Wrong, says Ian Altman. “The best elevator pitch shouldn’t explain what you do,” he says, “if your elevator pitch talks about WHAT you do instead of WHY people might need what you do, then your message is likely falling on deaf ears.”