Welcome to The Fordyce Letter:

The Fordyce Letter

Straight Talk for the Recruiting Profession


How-To, Motivation

If All You Do Is Think You Should Be Doing Better, You Won’t



RecruiterU

When I was 16 years old I came home from a particularly hard day’s work at Burger King where I commanded a wage of $3.35 per hour. (Yeah, minimum wage.) My very loving and supportive mother asked me how my day was and I remember answering, “It was long, difficult and hot…  I should be making A LOT more to do this job!” I was expecting a supportive hug, a “Keep it up honey, they’ll recognize your worth.”… Something like that.

My mother’s response floored me; I’ll never forget it. She said in a pretty terse tone, “NO you shouldn’t! You DON’T KNOW ANYTHING YET!”

Wow! I felt the blood drain from my face and felt very humbled and a bit humiliated, honestly.

As Tim Russert wrote, “The older I get the smarter my father  seems to get.” Substitute ‘mother’ in that sentence and that is how I feel now. You

How-To

Skills Can Be Taught, But Attitude is Forever



Positive Attitude

Positive AttitudeWhen hiring for a new position, all employers want to recruit the most talented and skilled candidates possible – preferably with a great attitude too. In reality, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find potential hires who “have it all.” All too frequently, these “have it all” individuals aren’t actively seeking a move.

Instead, employers are faced with an ever decreasing talent pool where the right combination of attitude, culture fit, and skills are difficult to find in one person.

In the final decision making process, which one is the most important?

Sourcing

10 More Reasons Why You Should Consider the ‘Overqualified’



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overqualified-150x120Editor’s note: This is the second of two posts offering 20 reasons why ‘overqualified’ candidates make good hires. This article first appeared as a single post on our sister site, ERE.net. Though aimed at corporate recruiters, it offers good advice and powerful ammunition for search consultants when discussing great, if ‘overqualified’ candidates with hiring managers and HR contacts. With the talent pool for top performers getting smaller every day, passing up qualified candidates because of too much experience or too impressive a previous title can mean the loss of the placement and the fee.

Yesterday, I listed 10 reasons hire the overqualified candidate. Today, I’ll list 10 more.

The 20 different reasons or benefits associated with hiring overqualified candidates fall into three categories: 1) recruiting/ business impacts; 2) reasons to be suspicious of qualifications; and 3) actions to mitigate potential problems. Yesterday’s 10 were all in the first category, which is where we pick up today.

Sourcing

10 Reasons to Ignore the Myth of the Overqualified Worker



overqualified-150x120

overqualified-150x120Editor’s note: This is the first of two posts offering 20 reasons why ‘overqualified’ candidates make good hires. This article first appeared as a single post on our sister site, ERE.net. Though aimed at corporate recruiters, it offers great advice and powerful ammunition for search consultants when discussing great, if ‘overqualified’ candidates with hiring managers and HR contacts. With the talent pool for top performers getting smaller every day, passing up qualified candidates because of too much experience or too impressive a previous title can mean the loss of the placement and the fee. Part two appears tomorrow.

Imagine being assigned a physician and then purposely rejecting them solely because they were overqualified for your medical situation. Well that’s exactly what happens when hiring managers reject candidates who have “too many” qualifications.

There is simply no excuse in this new era of data-based recruiting to adhere to this old wives’ tale in hiring. I have written in the past about the cost of rejecting “job jumpers” and in this article, I will focus on the false assumption that hiring candidates who are “overqualified” will result in frustrated employees who will quickly quit.

Ask Barb

Are Your Recruiters W-2 or 1099?



Ask Barb

Dear Barb,

I have my recruiters all working on a 1099 and at a recent conference I heard you say that they may not qualify as an independent contractor. Can you explain further?

Stephen Z.
New Orleans, LA

Dear Stephen,

Talk this over with your accountant and go to IRS.gov and print out the various requirements which must be met in order for someone to qualify as a 1099 employee. If they do not meet 100% of the qualifications listed, you need to deduct payroll taxes. Better safe than sorry.

Barbara J. Bruno, CPC, CTS

Industry News

Hiring Programmers. Degree Not Required



Glassodoor Q2 employee survey

Glassodoor Q2 employee surveyBy a surprisingly large percentage, CIOs  put more emphasis on skills and experience than on tech degrees from prestigious universities.

A Robert Half Technology survey of some 2,400 chief information officers at companies with more than 100 employees found 71% place “more weight on skills and experience than on whether or not a candidate attended college/university.” Another 12% said university prestige didn’t matter at all.

Now, that’s not to say most tech executives complete ignore degrees — 17% say they put at least some weight on a candidate’s education. But what the majority look for first are candidates who can get the job done.

Industry News

Staffing Firms Dominate Inc. 5000 HR Category



Inc. 5000 top 10

Inc. 5000 top 10Inc. magazine is out with its annual list of the 5,000 fastest growing private companies in the U.S. This year, 199 self-described human resource companies made the list, many, if not most of them recruiting and staffing firms.

The largest staffing firm is Elwood Staffing with $763 million in revenue last year. The company places temps in several areas from administrative and clerical positions to the skilled trades. It’s direct placement division — Elwood Professional – conducts searches for mid-level professionals on up to CEOs.

Fees, Jeff's On Call!

You Said You Were Doing This As a Favor



Jeff Allen COllection Tip

Editor’s note: Jeff Allen has heard every employer excuse you can imagine for not paying up — and dozens more that defy imagination. A few years ago he began documenting them in a weekly collections column. Because of the importance of collections, Fordyce will periodically reprise the most common situations he addressed. The complete collection is here.

What Client Says:

You said you wouldn’t bill us if we hired the candidate.

How Client Pays:

Business Development, Cold Calling

Your Pitch Will Stand Out When It’s About Them



elevatorpitch

elevatorpitchDoes your elevator pitch sound anything like this? Hi, I’m Bob and I recruit the smartest people who can hit the ground running for the best companies in the area. And I can do the same for you.”

Not too bad?

Wrong, says Ian Altman. “The best elevator pitch shouldn’t explain what you do,” he says, “if your elevator pitch talks about WHAT you do instead of WHY people might need what you do, then your message is likely falling on deaf ears.”

For Managers, The Business of Recruiting

Here’s How to Fix Your Comp Plan to Keep the Winners



Money hands - freedigital

Money pile - freedigitalCompensating recruiters – it’s straightforward, right? All recruiters just get a cut of what they bill – yes? Well actually, no!

While this may be the prevalent model in the U.S., in my view this approach is far too simplistic. It tends to suggest that the founders of the business have given no real thought to what they may ultimately want the firm to look like, and how compensation needs be structured in order to attract the best possible talent through every stage without overpaying. Is the business a lifestyle business or are you trying to create something of value and building towards an exit? The disciplines around compensation, profit drop through, and costs will all be different depending on the goal of the business. Owners of staffing firms have to think about why the best recruiter is going to join their company – and why the current top performer is going to stay.